Dave Thomson, a fifth-generation Hill End resident, shares his organic farm with his wife, painter Rebecca Wilson. The pair are quintessential Hill End residents – creative, industrious and with their fair share of stories about the historic village they call home.

    Photo Credit: Don Fuchs

    Off the road to Tambaroora, the Arch glints gold in the morning sun. Found in the Golden Gully, the imposing structure is just one of the strange formations made by the long-gone miners who worked the yellow ground.

    Photo Credit: Don Fuchs

    When artist Jeannie Littlewood moved to Hill End she brought with her Cocky Girl, a tame cockatoo aged in its mid-50s. 

    Photo Credit: Don Fuchs

    The streets of Hill End are quiet in the evenings, though when these buildings were first erected the town was deafened by the din of stamper batteries.

    Photo Credit: Don Fuchs

    Hill End has been painted by artists from far and wide – but it was 20th century painters Russel Drysdale and Donald Friend who first immortalised the town in Australian art.

    Photo Credit: Don Fuchs

    Pete Sparks mans the Royal Hotel bar, pouring drinks for a motley crowd of dusty shearers, local farmers and artists.

    Photo Credit: Don Fuchs

    Erected in 1872, the Royal Hotel once competed with twenty-eight other pubs for the custom of miners. Now it stands alone, the sole drinking establishment still open for business.

    Photo Credit: Don Fuchs

    The tombstones of Tambaroora Cemetery give a tragic insight into the lives and deaths of early miners and their families.

    Photo Credit: Don Fuchs

    You’re surrounded by ghosts in Hill End, says award-winning artist Rosemary Valadon, but her series Four Seasons pays homage to the abundance of life in the town.

    Photo Credit: Don Fuchs

    Landscape painter Luke Sciberras has always brought the outside world into the places he works and lives. Hill End locals warn us not to eat anything he offers – it might be roadkill, they say with a grin.

    Photo Credit: Don Fuchs

    Luke Sciberras reclines on a bed in his Hill End studio. Though he painted the town extensively when he first arrived, it’s now something more than a muse – a home.

    Photo Credit: Don Fuchs

    People, both locals and those from afar, have met to talk and drink at the Royal Hotel for more than a century. 

    Photo Credit: Don Fuchs

    Photographer Bill Moseley’s studio is filled with images captured by antiquarian processes as old as the 19th century building itself.

    Photo Credit: Don Fuchs

    School principal Chris Grossett fossicks for gold in his spare time, using cutting edge technologies to follow in the footsteps of those who founded the town. 

    Photo Credit: Don Fuchs

    It takes a roaring fire to warm potter Lino Alvarez’s huge studio, but he needs the space: he creates large ceramics for restaurants and homes the world-over.

    Photo Credit: Don Fuchs

GALLERY: Hill End, NSW

By AG STAFF | October 25, 2016

Once brought to life by one of NSW’s largest gold rushes, the now tiny town of Hill End has played a central role in Australia’s art world for generations. From Russel Drysdale to Brett Whiteley, Margaret Olley to John Olsen, Hill End has played muse to the best in the business. Today the tradition continues, with some of Australia’s foremost artists calling the town home. All photos by Don Fuchs. Read more about Hill End in AG#135, out now.