Crean Glacier was the second glacier Sir Ernest Shackleton faced as he traversed South Georgia Island about 100 years ago. When Tim Jarvis returned to the glacier two and half years ago, he found it heavily denuded of snow.

    Photo Credit: Tim Jarvis

    Carstensz Pyramid in Indonesia has had glaciers for at least the last 30,000 years, yet according to Tim Jarvis they have under two years left before they melt away. 

    Photo Credit: Scott Hanna

    Tim Jarvis climbed Carstensz Pyramid in Papua, Indonesia, the highest mountain on the oceanic continent. It was the first stop on his three-peak series to raise awareness about climate change during the COP21 Paris climate change talks. 

    Photo Credit: Mike Roberts

    Carstensz Pyramid is one of the world’s seven summits, and is considered to be very technically challenging. With notoriously bad weather and an 800m day of difficult mountaineering, Tim Jarvis is expects it to be the most challenging of the three peaks he’d tackle for his 25zero project. 

    Photo Credit: Scott Hanna

    At 6268m, Chimborazo is Ecuador’s highest mountain, as well as a dormant volcano. Despite being only one degree south of the equator, the mountain is covered in glaciers, which provide water for Ecuadorans but are melting at an alarming rate. 

    Photo Credit: Courtesy of 25zero

    Glacier calving, or ice calving, shown here at Neko Harbour on the Antarctic Peninsula, is the sudden breaking away of a mass of ice from a glacier. The average annual air temperature of the Antarctic Peninsula has increased by about 3°C over the past 50 years. 

    Photo Credit: Tim Jarvis

    Mount Stanley is Africa’s third highest peak. Experts predict Stanley’s glaciers will be gone by 2030 due to climate change.

    Photo Credit: Mark Horrel

    When Australian adventurer Tim Jarvis crossed Konig Glacier on South Georgia Island almost 100 years after Sir Ernest Shackleton did the same, he found it had retreated many kilometres up the valley. 

    Photo Credit: Tim Jarvis

    One of Ecuador’s most active volcanoes, Cotopaxi was one of the 25 mountains Tim Jarvis and the 25zero team summitted to raise awareness about glacier melt and climate change. 

    Photo Credit: Courtesy of 25zero

    Cotopaxi has lost about 40% of its glacial cap since 1976, and the trend is expected to continue. Its meltwaters provide fresh water and hydroelectric power to Ecuador’s capital, Quito. In 2015, NASA captured satellite images of the Cotopaxi Glacier showing the rate of glacial melt had increased. 

    Photo Credit: Courtesy of 25zero

GALLERY: The sentinels of climate change

By AG STAFF | November 16, 2015

AG Society-sponsored adventurer Tim Jarvis hoped to “instil a sense of urgency” at the COP21 climate change conference in Paris when he climbed three equatorial mountains with melting glaciers and live streamed what he saw to world leaders. The climb was a part of the 25zero project, which coordinated summits of all 25 equatorial mountains with glaciers predicted to disappear within the next 25 years – some of which are pictured in the gallery below. This year, Tim Jarvis will be a guest speaker at the AG Society Awards night. To book your tickets click HERE.