UNKNOWN BUT BEAUTIFUL

    SOUTHERN HAIRY CRAYFISH
    Euastacus hirsutus

    STATUS: ENDANGERED

    The southern hairy crayfish is one of the many amazing freshwater crayfish
    species found in eastern Australia. This vibrant species is found in only 50km of streams along the Illawarra escarpment and is almost completely unknown to the general public – a situation shared by many of our freshwater crayfish.

    Macquarie Rivulet, Macquarie Pass, New South Wales

    Canon EOS 5D Mk IV, Canon 15mm f2.8 fisheye, 0.3, f/14, ISO 320, Ikelite DS-160 strobe, handheld, Ikelite 200DL underwater housing

    Photo Credit: Alex Pike, New South Wales

    THE GUARDIAN

    GREY NURSE SHARK
    Carcharias taurus

    STATUS: VULNERABLE

    The grey nurse shark (Carcharias taurus) glides in from the darkness of the reef gutters accompanied by schooling fish seeking protection, not from humankind, but from their natural predators. Listed as vulnerable by the IUCN, Australia’s Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act lists the east-coast population of Carcharias taurus as critically endangered.

    Nine Mile Reef, New South Wales Queensland border

    Nikon D810, Tokina DX 10–17mm fisheye, 1/125, f/8, ISO 160, two YS250 PROs strobes

    Photo Credit: Andy Wingate, Queensland

    DOUBLE JUMP

    BLACK-FOOTED ROCK-WALLABY
    Petrogale lateralis

    STATUS: VULNERABLE

    Black-footed rock-wallabies live on rocky cliffs where they spend the day resting in the shadow of rock holes and come out at the end of the afternoon to feed. When they leave
    their hiding places, they move along the cliff, jumping from one rock to another. With the low sun at the end of afternoon, its shadow seems to jump too.

    Cape Range National Park, Western
    Australia

    Canon EOS 7D Mk II, 300mm f2.8 L IS USM, 1/3200, f/5.6, ISO 400, tripod

    Photo Credit: Brieuc Graillot-Denaix, France

    QUOLL REFLECTIONS

    EASTERN QUOLL
    Dasyurus viverrinus

    STATUS: ENDANGERED

    Once night fell, high up the mountain near an old hut, a young eastern quoll came out, bouncing around the campsite. It didn’t look at us at all. After following it for about two hours, it came close to this pool for a drink. I used a single flash off-camera, off centre and down low to get the reflection I needed.

    Mt Field National Park, Tasmania

    Nikon D850, Nikon 70–200 f2.8, 1/250, f/4, ISO 500, Nikon SB5000

    Photo Credit: Charles Davis, New South Wales

    CURIOUS ENCOUNTER

    MERTENS’ WATER MONITOR
    Varanus mertensi

    STATUS: ENDANGERED

    Mertens’ water monitors are highly inquisitive. This extremely bold specimen ostentatiously approached
    me to investigate the good-looking lizard in my dome port while I observed another nearby pair engaged in courtship – sadly for him he was staring at his own reflection, not the mate of his dreams.

    Adelaide River, Northern Territory

    Olympus OMD EM-1 Mk II, Olympus
    8mm f1.8, 1/125, f/11, ISO 64, two Sea & Sea YS-D2 strobes, manual flash output, handheld, Nauticam underwater housing

    Photo Credit: Etienne Littlefair, Northern Territory

    A FEAST FIT FOR A QUOLL

    EASTERN QUOLL
    Dasyurus viverrinus

    STATUS: ENDANGERED
    We came across this eastern quoll (Dasyurus viverrinus) feeding on a road-hit pademelon in Tasmania. Once widespread throughout southern Australia, there are now no remaining natural populations on the mainland. They are classified as an endangered species as their populations are continuing to fall dramatically.

    Cradle Mountain, Tasmania

    Canon EOS 5D Mk III, EF100mm f2.8 L macro IS USM, 1/100, f/7.1, ISO 400, off-camera flash

    Photo Credit: Jasmine Vink, Brisbane, Queensland

    SPOT THE DIFFERENCE

    ZEBRA SHARK
    Stegostoma fasciatum

    WHALE SHARK
    Rhincodon typus

    STATUSES: ENDANGERED

    I have spent years photographing the whale sharks on Ningaloo Reef but never have I had an encounter quite as unique as this. A whale shark accompanied by a zebra shark with the most spectacular spot pattern. Coincidentally, these two spotted sharks are both carpet sharks.

    Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia

    Nikon D810, Sigma 15mm 1:2.8 EX DG fisheye, 1/160, f/9, ISO 160, Nauticam NA-D810 underwater housing and 6-inch glass dome

    Photo Credit: Jess Hadden, Western Australia

    PLAYFUL PRACTICE

    AUSTRALIAN SEA LION
    Neophoca cinerea

    STATUS: ENDANGERED

    For half an hour or so I watched these
    two sub-adult Australian sea lions chase each other. They were playfully fighting and mimicking breeding and generally showing off to the camera in their practice of becoming adults!

    Hopkins Island, South Australia

    Nikon D850, Nikon 14–24mm f2.8, 1/250, f/11, ISO 400, two INON Z240 strobes, Aquatica AD850 underwater housing, homemade lens dome port

    Photo Credit: Matty Smith, New South Wales

    JUST HANGING ON

    GREY-HEADED FLYING-FOX
    Pteropus poliocephalus

    STATUS: VULNERABLE

    On extremely hot evenings grey-headed flyingfoxes will dip their bellies into the river so they can lick their wet fur for a drink. This female still carrying her young misjudged her approach and nearly dropped the baby on impact with the river, but somehow it just managed to hang on.

    River Torrens, Adelaide, South Australia

    Canon 7D Mk II, Canon 100–400mm
    f4.5–5.6 L IS USM and Canon Extender EF 1.4X III, 1/1600, f/8, ISO 1600, handheld

    Photo Credit: Neil Edwards, South Australia

    THE EXCHANGE

    FAIRY TERN
    Sternula nereis

    STATUS: VULNERABLE

    This male offers a fish to the female in
    the hope of mating; usually the fish is
    exchanged during mating. The female
    quickly left once she got the fish. Fairy
    terns face many threats, which include
    loss of nesting habitat due to coastal
    development.

    Mandurah Estuary, Mandurah, Western Australia

    Canon 1DX Mk II, Canon 500 f4 II IS with 1.4x extender, 1/3200, f/7.1, ISO 800, handheld

    Photo Credit: Shelley Pearson, Western Australia

    The AG Nature Photographer of the Year Awards are sponsored by Coral Expeditions.

    Photo Credit:

AG Nature Photographer of the Year 2019: Threatened species shortlist

By AG STAFF | June 27, 2019

In this category, we asked for photos of flora or fauna that have been deemed threatened, rare, vulnerable or endangered. This shortlist is a reminder of how many beautiful animals face extinction if we do not act. These photos will be exhibited at the South Australian Museum in Adelaide from Friday 16 August until Sunday 10 November 2019 and the Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences in Sydney from Friday 16 August until Sunday October 20