FROZEN WAVE

    CHINSTRAP PENGUIN
    Pygoscelis antarcticus

    On assignment for an Antarctic expedition company I photographed these chinstrap penguins making their way towards the frozen arched edge of an iceberg at quite a distance from our ship. I like the juxtaposition of the tiny form of the penguins seemingly
    vulnerable in a dramatic icy Antarctic landscape.

    South Orkney Islands

    Canon EOS 5D Mk IV, EF 100–400mm f4.5–5.6 L IS II USM, 1/1250, f/5.6, ISO 1250, handheld

    Photo Credit: Andrew Peacock, Queensland

    LIFE IN THE ESKY

    EASTERN GREY KANGAROO
    Macropus giganteus

    I’d been chasing storms all winter to film kangaroos in the snow; this storm
    in particular held lots of promise. The snow started coming down like large
    snowballs and the roos could do nothing but stand and be engulfed in the blizzard. The snow swirled around them from all directions and in 10
    minutes the world was white.

    Kosciuszko National Park, New South Wales

    Nikon D850, Nikon 24–70 f2.8, 1/1000, f/2.8, ISO 500

    Photo Credit: Charles Davis, New South Wales

    GLIDERS’ HOME

    SUGAR GLIDER
    Petaurus breviceps

    I’d spent months watching the gliders on my family farm and finding the nest hollow was the priority. After many long, cold nights I narrowed it down to this old, dead, brittle gum. Each night they would emerge at 8.28pm, poking their little heads out for five minutes to make sure it was safe before leaving to feed.

    Cooma, New South Wales

    Nikon D850, Nikon 200–400 f4, 1/250, f/13, ISO 3200, three Nikon SB700, RRS TVC33 tripod, BH55 ball head

    Photo Credit: Charles Davis, New South Wales

    PELICANS AND GODWITS

    AUSTRALIAN PELICANS
    Pelecanus conspicillatus
    BLACK-TAILED GODWITS
    Limosa limosa
    BLACK-WINGED STILT
    Himantopus himantopus

    I was fortunate to come across a flock of pelicans and godwits flying low over
    the Mary River Floodplains. Looking down from above allowed me to see
    these beautiful creatures, complete with reflections and shadows, against a background of blue water rather than a blue sky. It was intriguing to see the smaller godwits and lone stilt alongside the larger pelicans.

    Mary River Floodplains, Northern Territory

    Canon EOS 5D Mk IV, Canon EF 100–400mm f4.5–5.6 L II USM
    IS 400mm, 1/2500, f/10, ISO 1600, handheld from a helicopter

    Photo Credit: Clara Davies, Victoria

    A CROC’S-EYE VIEW

    FRESHWATER CROCODILE Crocodylus johnsoni

    This image depicts an unusual role reversal. The small freshwater crocodiles that inhabit
    most public swimming holes in the Top End spend their days under the surface, watching
    human swimmers obliviously floating and splashing – here the tables have turned.

    Batchelor, Northern Territory

    Olympus OMD EM–1 Mk II, Olympus Pro 7–14mm f2.8 12mm, 1/80, f/4.5, ISO 200, two Sea & Sea YS-D2 strobes, manual flash output, handheld, Nauticam underwater camera housing

    Photo Credit: Etienne Littlefair, Northern Territory

    EMPEROR GUM MOTH

    EMPEROR GUM MOTH
    Opodiphthera eucalypti

    Emperor gum moths are a large, striking species. This photo was
    captured early in the morning; the moth was perched perfectly
    on the spotted gum. In this image I wanted to capture both the
    beauty of the moth and the surrounding spotted gum forest.

    Tathra, New South Wales

    Canon 7D Mk II, Sigma 10–20mm, 1/200, f/7.0,
    ISO 500, handheld

    Photo Credit: Harrison Warne, New South Wales

    THE SHADOW

    UNIDENTIFIED SPECIES

    The low angle of the late afternoon sun together with the position of the white wall allowed for this giant  shadow of a little beetle standing at the edge while exploring its habitat.

    Belair, South Australia

    Canon EOS 5D Mk II, Canon EF 100mm f2.8 L macro IS USM, 1/160, f/4.0, ISO 2000, handheld

    Photo Credit: Holger Link, New South Wales

    MOUNTAIN ECHIDNA

    SHORT-BEAKED ECHIDNA
    Tachyglossus aculeatus

     

    I followed this echidna for two days, its little tracks in the fresh snow leading me for kilometres to every dead tree and tuft of grass on the snow-covered range. When I finally tracked it down it was over 2000 metres above sea level and not bothered in the slightest about being surrounded by snow and ice.

    Australian Main Range, New South Wales

    Nikon D810, Nikon 28–300 f5.6, 1/2500, f/8.0, ISO 640

     

    Photo Credit: Charles Davis, New South Wales

    FOXES ON THE WING

    GREY-HEADED FLYING-FOX
    Pteropus poliocephalus

    Grey-headed flying-foxes have a fascinating way of drinking. They fly
    low so as to dip their belly into the water. Without pausing, they lick
    their fur dry. This usually occurs at night, but they may exhibit this
    behaviour in daylight on a really hot day.

    Centennial Park, Sydney, New South Wales

    Canon 5DS, EF 300mm f4, 1/1000, f/7.1, ISO 1600, handheld

    Photo Credit: Paul Huntley, New South Wales

    SPIDER ON ICE

    UNIDENTIFIED SPECIES

    An overnight blizzard had knocked a myrtle tree down onto the path of the
    Enchanted Walk next to Cradle Mountain Lodge. I was out in the brilliant sunshine the next morning looking for subjects for my macro lens and came across this tiny spider crossing a patch of snow.

    Enchanted Walk, Cradle Valley, Tasmania

    Canon 5D II, Canon 100mm f2.8L macro, 1/4000, f/3.2,
    ISO 400, handheld

    Photo Credit: Raoul Slater, Queensland

    SMALL BUT MIGHTY

    COMMENSAL AMPHIPOD LIVING IN SOLITARY ASCIDIAN

    I was searching for miniature pygmy seahorses on the reefs of West Papua
    when I happened across this tiny amphipod crustacean. Just 0.5–1cm long, this male is sitting at the mouth of the sea squirt to guard the females and young within. According to an amphipod expert, this is likely a new species.

    Raja Ampat, West Papua, Indonesia

    Nikon D800, Nikkor 105mm macro, 1/125, f/14, ISO 100, twin
    INON Z240 strobes, handheld, Subal underwater housing

    Photo Credit: Richard Smith, United Kingdom

    K’GARI TURTLES

    FRASER ISLAND SHORT-NECK TURTLE
    Emydura macquarii

    These short-necked turtles are everywhere in the fresh water of Lake Allom on Fraser Island. They were very interested in my large dome port and fun to photograph.

    Lake Allom, Fraser Island (K’gari), Queensland

    Canon 1DX, Canon 14mm 2.8 L II USM, 1/125, f/6.3,
    ISO 1250
    ANIMAL

    Photo Credit: Sean Scott, Queensland

    DAWN GRAZER

    RED-NECKED WALLABY
    Macropus rufogriseus

    A –4˚C overnight temperature made me reluctant to leave my cosy swag, but when I peered out to see this grazing red-necked wallaby, I leapt up. I was very happy it kept feeding long enough for me to dig out my camera from the back of my car.

    Wollemi National Park, New South Wales

    Canon EOS 600D, EF-S 18–200mm, 1/250, f/5.6,
    ISO 200, handheld

    Photo Credit: Simon Cherriman, Western Australia

    The AG Nature Photographer of the Year Awards are sponsored by Coral Expeditions.

    Photo Credit:

AG Nature Photographer of the Year 2019: Animal habitat shortlist

By AG STAFF | June 27, 2019

In this category, we asked for photos showing animals in the environment in which they live – this environment could be natural or built, and the animal, either native or feral. The only rule was that the animal must not be captive and has claimed the habitat independently. This shortlist shows the beautiful variety of landscapes and animals we enjoy in Australia. These photos will be exhibited at the South Australian Museum in Adelaide from Friday 16 August until Sunday 10 November 2019.