AN OUTBACK HAVEN

    GREATER BILBY, MACROTIS LAGOTIS

    STATUS: VULNERABLE

    The Arid Recovery Reserve is surrounded by a feral predator proof fence, which allows the native inhabitants to live naturally. Feral species are continuing to have a dramatic impact on our wildlife. Safe haven reserves like this are important to safeguard susceptible native species until a solution can be found.

    Arid Recovery Reserve, South Australia

    Canon EOS 5D Mk III, EF 100mm f/2.8L macro IS USM, 1/160, f/10, ISO 1000, handheld Speedlite with soft box

    Photo Credit: Jasmine Vink, Queensland

    AUSTRALIAN SEA LION FAMILY PORTRAIT

    AUSTRALIAN SEA LION, NEOPHOCA CINEREA

    STATUS: ENDANGERED

    The endangered Australian sea lion is one of the most playful of all the pinnipeds. I waited until all the other snorkellers had exited the water and the high energy games calmed down. The sea lions settled and became comfortable with my presence, enabling me to shoot this intimate family portrait.

    Hopkins Island, South Australia

    Nikon D810, Nikkor 14–24mm f/2.8 ED, 1/250, f/16, ISO 800, two INON Z240 strobes, Aquatica digital water housing, homemade 16.8-inch acrylic port

    Photo Credit: Matty Smith, New South Wales

    KURANDA TREE FROG

    KURANDA TREE FROG, LITORIA MYOLA

    STATUS: CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

    The Kuranda tree frog (Litoria myola) is found only within 1350ha around Kuranda, Queensland. Although their population varies year to year based on rainfall, fewer than 1000 breeding adults are thought to exist. Habitat destruction, fragmentation and upstream disturbances threaten this frog’s survival.

    Kuranda, Queensland

    Nikon D800E, Nikkor 105mm f/2.8 ED, 1/320, f/7.1, ISO 100, Nikon SB900 on hot shoe, Nikon SB700 off -hand

    Photo Credit: Scott Trageser, USA

    NUMBAT DREAMING

    NUMBAT, MYRMECOBIUS FASCIATUS

    STATUS: ENDANGERED

    A young numbat looks out from the safety of its burrow in a burnt-out stump. The numbat is now rarer than the giant panda; their main threats are predation by feral cats and foxes and land-clearing. Sadly, the numbat will remain in the threatened species category for a while yet.

    Dryandra Woodland, Western Australia

    Canon EOS 5D Mk III, Canon EF 100–400mm f/4.5–5.6L IS USM, 1/200, f/8, ISO 500, handheld

    Photo Credit: Robert McLean, Western Australia

    ON THE BRINK OF EXTINCTION

    GOLDEN-SHOULDERED PARROT, PSEPHOTELLUS CHRYSOPTERYGIUS

    STATUS: ENDANGERED

    The golden-shouldered parrot inhabits open forested grassland and builds its nest in the taller magnetic termite mounds. It is listed as endangered (CITES I), with population surveys pointing to a total wild population of about 2000 birds, with about 300 breeding pairs. Their numbers are decreasing.

    Far north Queensland

    Canon EOS 1D Mk IV, Canon 800mm f/5.6L IS, 1/1600, f/10, ISO 1250, tripod from a hide

    Photo Credit: Ofer Levy, New South Wales

    HOODED PLOVER

    HOODED PLOVER, THINORNIS CUCULLATUS

    STATUS: VULNERABLE

    I selected this image because it shows the beauty of the hooded plover and its habitat, but also the harshness of where it lives and breeds. Nests are often simple scrapes on the beach where there is little protection from mother nature, often resulting in nests being washed away.

    Killarney, Victoria

    Canon 1DX, Canon 500mm f/4L IS II USM and Canon 1.4 extender III, 1/2000, f/7.1, ISO 320, Wimberley gimbal head on skimmer pod

    Photo Credit: James White, Victoria

    MIND YOUR MANNERS

    FAIRY TERN, STERNULA NEREIS

    STATUS: VULNERABLE

    The fairy tern’s courtship ritual involves the males bringing gifts of fi sh prior to mating. One male was doing his best to woo a rather indiff erent female. When a second suitor arrived the female tried to snatch the fi rst off ering, putting a swift end to the budding romance.

    Nairns, Western Australia

    Canon 7D Mk II, 400mm, 1/6400, f/6.3, ISO 640, handheld

    Photo Credit: Cherilyn Corker, Western Australia

    TURTLE REFLECTION

    GREEN SEA TURTLE, CHELONIA MYDAS

    STATUS: ENDANGERED

    On an early morning snorkel off the south-western shelf at Heron Island, this green sea turtle actually came out of the deep to look at us. We were more surprised than it, I think. It hung out with us for a while and then faded back into the blue.

    Heron Island, Queensland

    Nikon D7200, Tokina 10– 17mm, 1/160, f/13, ISO 320

    Photo Credit: Johnny Gaskell, Queensland

    MAYBE 2 IN A 1000

    HAWKSBILL TURTLE, ERETMOCHELYS IMBRICATA

    STATUS: CRITICALLY ENDANGERED

    As the sun sets over the Bismarck Sea, two newly hatched hawksbill turtles swim past my waiting camera. They have a long, hard struggle ahead of them to reach maturity; only one in a thousand will survive.

    Lissenung Island, Papua New Guinea

    Nikon D500, Nikkor 10.5mm f/2.8 E ED fisheye, 1/15, f/22, ISO 320, two INON Z240 strobes, Aquatica digital water housing and 4-inch glass port

    Photo Credit: Matty Smith, New South Wales

    FITS THE BILL

    EASTERN CURLEW, NUMENIUS MADAGASCARIENSIS

    STATUS: ENDANGERED

    A slow approach on my belly got me close enough for great views of this eastern curlew. Sadly, these wary, migratory shorebirds, once common in Australia, are now listed as endangered internationally and critically endangered in this country.

    Stockton Sandspit, Newcastle, New South Wales

    Canon EOS 5D Mk III, Canon EF 600mm f/4L IS II USM + 1.4X III, 1/3200, f/8, ISO 500, handheld with beanbag support

    Photo Credit: Michael Hanvey, New South Wales

    The AG Nature Photographer of the Year Awards are sponsored by Coral Expeditions.

    Photo Credit: Coral Expeditions

AG Nature Photographer of the Year 2018: Threatened species shortlist

By AG STAFF | June 18, 2018

In this category, we asked for photos of flora or fauna that have been deemed threatened, rare, vulnerable or endangered. This shortlist is a reminder of how many beautiful animals face extinction if we do not act. These photos will be exhibited at the South Australian Museum in Adelaide (24 August – 11 November 2018 ) and the Australian Museum in Sydney (24 August to 27 January)