The national parks of New England’s high country are on lands forged by violent geologic forces. These magnificent landscapes offer great bushwalking opportunities

    Photo Credit: Drew Hopper

    Wollomombi Gorge Lookout is an easily accessible lookout overlooking the spectacular Wollomombi Falls. This is during the dry season, but the falls are most impressive after  heavy rains, when the flow transforms the gorge into an ethereal wonder.

    Photo Credit: Drew Hopper

    The Green Gully Track in Oxley Wild Rivers NP is one of the best places in the world
    to see brush-tailed rock-wallabies (Petrogale penicillata) bouncing about the rocky ­outcrops.

    Photo Credit: Foundation for National Parks and Wildlife/Shane Ruming

    Sailsbury Waters plunges off the escarpment into Dangars Gorge. Salisbury Waters Track is a fantastic introduction to gorge bushwalking, great for wildlife and birdwatching with the option for overnight camping off the beaten track. Find the full story in the Jan/Feb issue of Australian Geographic (AG 124).

    Photo Credit: Drew Hopper

    Gara River alongside Threlfall Track is the breath of fresh air you crave on a warm day, and also a great birdwatching location.

    Photo Credit: Drew Hopper

    New England’s high-country national parks – New ­England, Cathedral Rock, Guy Fawkes River, Chaelundi and Oxley Wild Rivers – are home to a huge gorge wilderness, more than 500km of wild rivers, accessible picnic and camping grounds, accommodation and walking tracks from easy to challenging, short and long. 

    Photo Credit: Foundation for National Parks and Wildlife

    Dawn light highlights the canopy from Dangars Falls Lookout at Oxley Wild River National Park in NSW.

    Photo Credit: Drew Hopper

    Dangars Falls Lookout is the perfect vantage point for birdwatching and soaking up the morning sun as it rises above the valley.

    Photo Credit: Drew Hopper

    Brush-tailed rock-wallabies were once common on outcrops of the Great Dividing Range, from eastern Victoria to southern Queensland. Today, they are in decline and colonies are sparsely distributed. Their primary habitat is north-eastern NSW, where 80 per cent of the population is found, much of it in regions of New England, such as the Oxley Wild Rivers NP.

    Photo Credit: Foundation for National Parks and Wildlife/Shane Ruming

    Four-wheel-drive-accessible visitor areas and the famed Green Gully Track are for more serious explorers of the park’s remote heart; the track traverses elevations from 1100m down to 300m.

    Photo Credit: Foundation for National Parks and Wildlife

    Tony Allison and Jess Wright, enjoying the warmth of the campsite fire at Dangars Falls campgrounds. The campground also has toilet facilities, picnic tables and barbecues for day trippers. Find the full story in the Jan/Feb issue of Australian Geographic (AG 124).

    Photo Credit: Drew Hopper

    Wollomombi Falls in Oxley Wild Rivers National Park looking very dry after a long period without rain.

    Photo Credit: Drew Hopper

    Threlfall Walking Track in Gara Gorge in the northern section of Oxley Wild Rivers National Park, is a medium length track. The track traces the gorge ridge as it follows the route of the historic 1894 hydro-electric scheme, along weathered embarkments and ancient cuttings of granite.

    Photo Credit: Drew Hopper

    Blackbutt and spotted gums reflect gracefully in Gara River in Oxley Wild Rivers National Park.

    Photo Credit: Drew Hopper

    Tony Allison photographing the wild gorge country from the edge of escarpment in Oxley Wild Rivers National Park.

     

    Photo Credit: Drew Hopper

    Springtime is the best time to visit Oxley, with an array of colourful flowers blooming to life.

    Photo Credit: Drew Hopper

    Tony Allison and Jess Wright taking in the jaw-dropping views in Gara Gorge, the northern section of Oxley Wild Rivers National Park.

     

    Photo Credit: Drew Hopper

    Threfall Walking Track offers walkers a variety of landscapes, ranging form subalpine forest to granite escarpments and lush rivers perfect for taking an afternoon swim. Find the full story in the Jan/Feb issue of Australian Geographic (AG 124).

    Photo Credit: Drew Hopper

Gallery: Oxley Wild Rivers

By AG STAFF | December 16, 2014

New England’s Oxley Wild Rivers National Park is distinguished by its many waterfalls and the dry rainforest that cloak its gullies and slopes. Rivers plunge over cliffs to create one of the largest gorge systems in Australia, providing secluded swimming, canoeing and fishing spots. Lookouts at Apsley, Dangars and Wollomombi falls ­provide breathtaking perspectives at every turn.