Tag: Indigenous Australia

Mapping Australia´s dark history: Lyndall Ryan (Rebroadcast)

Lyndall Ryan´s interest in the history of Australia has grown since her early days as a scholar researching the history of Tasmania and the consequences of the “Black War” for the local Aboriginal population. Through her work, the historian became heavily invested in the survival stories of Indigenous Australians and the frontier wars, which included acknowledgment of massacres committed by European settlers in the early days of the nation. Her research and expertise in the field got her involved in the legendary “History Wars” during the 1990s and early 2000s with other historians. In 2017, Lyndall gained worldwide exposure after she and her team at the University of Newcastle in NSW published an interactive online map of massacre sites in Australia. The map went viral and since its first release has turned into a national project in which Australian´s are helping to tell the whole story of the nation’s past. Here you can find out more about Lyndall’s work and look at the map: https://www.newcastle.edu.au/profile/lyndall-ryan https://c21ch.newcastle.edu.au/colonialmassacres/map.php This Episode of Talking Australia is hosted by Angela Heathcote (Digital Producer at Australian Geographic) and produced by Ben Kanthak (www.beachshackpodcasts.com).

How indigenous thinking can save the world: Tyson Yunkaporta

Tyson Yunkaporta belongs to the Apalech Clan from Western Cape York and is the author of the award winning book “Sand Talk: How Indigenous Thinking Can Save The World”. He is also a senior lecturer in Indigenous Knowledges, a published poet and exhibited artist. On this episode Tyson talks about his book and the great value of indigenous knowledge that goes way beyond environmental and conservational topics and is often overlooked when it comes to finding solutions to complex issues such as history, education, money or power.   This Episode of Talking Australia is hosted by Angela Heathcote (Digital Producer at Australian Geographic) and produced by Ben Kanthak (www.beachshackpodcasts.com).   You can also follow us on Instagram @australiangeographic

Why we have to stop ignoring indigenous science and knowledge: Ian Morris (Part2)

Ian Morris is a zoologist, educator, conservationist and author that has worked with the traditional owners of Arnhem Land for decades and speaks Djambarrpuyŋu, Warramirri & Gupapuyŋu – all local Indigenous languages. Today, he works as an environmental consultant and teaches children the importance of indigenous science and knowledge. He believes: “If you have the right attitude when you are out in the bush, you are not afraid of what might happen to you but you are fascinated by what’s around you.” This Episode of Talking Australia is hosted by Liz Ginis (Managing Editor Digital at Australian Geographic) and produced by Ben Kanthak (www.beachshackpodcasts.com).   You can also follow us on Instagram @australiangeographic

Why we have to stop ignoring indigenous science and knowledge: Ian Morris (Part1)

Ian Morris is a zoologist, educator, conservationist and author that has worked with the traditional owners of Arnhem Land for decades and speaks Djambarrpuyŋu, Warramirri & Gupapuyŋu – all local Indigenous languages. Today, he works as an environmental consultant and teaches children the importance of indigenous science and knowledge. He believes: “If you have the right attitude when you are out in the bush, you are not afraid of what might happen to you but you are fascinated by what’s around you.” This Episode of Talking Australia is hosted by Liz Ginis (Managing Editor Digital at Australian Geographic) and produced by Ben Kanthak (www.beachshackpodcasts.com).   You can also follow us on Instagram @australiangeographic

The Power of Deadly Science: Corey Tutt

Besides his day job as a University Research Assistant Corey Tutt works tirelessly to raise funds and books for his initiative Deadly Science. So far the program has distributed 5000 books and 70 telescopes to Australian schools. For his efforts to bring knowledge and resources to some of Australia’s most remote schools Corey has been named the 2020 NSW Young Australian of the Year. Being an indigenous person himself his motivation is to inspire other young indigenous people and empower them to believe they can be whatever they dream to be. On this episode he talks about his upbringing, what it is like to work as an Alpaca shearer and how he got to become a zookeeper without a university degree. Corey also shares how Deadly Science evolved from sending out a few private books to an ever-growing initiative that raises thousands of dollars and gains more and more supporters. You can find out more about Deadly Science here: https://deadlyscience.icu/ This Episode of Talking Australia is hosted by Angela Heathcote (Digital Producer at Australian Geographic) and produced by Ben Kanthak (www.beachshackpodcasts.com). You can also follow us on Instagram @australiangeographic

Guardian of the Kimberley: Albert Wiggan

Albert Wiggan is an inspiration. A traditional owner and Bardi-Kija-Nyul Nyul man from the Dampier Peninsula of Western Australia, he’s also an Indigenous ranger and sees himself as a translator between Western science and Aboriginal teachings. “I feel part of both worlds,” the 38 year old says. His knowledge and love for nature led him to fight the government’s plans for the world’s largest LNG gas export terminal at James Price Point (a vital marine sanctuary, home to songlines and dinosaur footprints). Albert lobbied the Supreme Court and fronted a blockade until the developer withdrew from the project. On this episode of Talking Australia, Albert discusses his concerns for the future of the Kimberley and how the entire nation can benefit from the region – without extraction and potential devastation of one of country’s most pristine areas. This episode of Talking Australia is hosted by Chrissie Goldrick (Editor-in-chief at Australian Geographic) and produced by Ben Kanthak (www.beachshackpodcasts.com). You can also follow us on Instagram @australiangeographic

Mapping Australia´s dark history: Lyndall Ryan

WARNING: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander listeners are warned that this episode may contain stories and names of deceased persons. Lyndall Ryan´s interest in the history of Australia has grown since her early days as a scholar researching the history of Tasmania and the consequences of the “Black War” for the local Aboriginal people. Through her work, the historian became heavily invested in the survival stories of Indigenous Australians and the frontier wars, which included acknowledgment of massacres in the early days of the nation. Her research and expertise in the field got her involved in the legendary “History Wars” during the 1990s and early 2000s with other historians. In 2017, Lyndall gained worldwide exposure after she and her team at the University of Newcastle in NSW published an interactive online map of massacre sites in Australia. The map went viral and since its first release has turned into a national project in which Australian´s are helping to tell the whole story of the nation’s past. Here you can find out more about Lyndall’s work and look at the map: https://www.newcastle.edu.au/profile/lyndall-ryan https://c21ch.newcastle.edu.au/colonialmassacres/map.php This Episode of Talking Australia is hosted by Angela Heathcote (Digital Producer at Australian Geographic) and produced by Ben Kanthak (www.beachshackpodcasts.com). You can also follow us on Instagram @australiangeographic.