VIDEO: Dinosaurs on the big screen

Are the dinosaurs on TV and in films such as Jurassic World accurate reconstructions or pale imitations? We look at the evidence.
Contributor

John Pickrell

Contributor

John Pickrell

John Pickrell is the editor of Australian Geographic. He is a science writer, author, nature lover and self-confessed geek. Blog posts range over Southern Hemisphere palaeontology, dinosaurs, megafauna, archaeology, palaeoanthropology and a smattering of other topics.

By John Pickrell July 27, 2015 Reading Time: < 1

DINOSAURS HOLD A special place in the imagination. They’re everywhere from kids’ books to movies to video games… they’ve even made an appearance on Doctor Who. But how do we know what dinosaurs look like? How accurate is the modern image of the prehistoric dinosaur?

Join me as, along with Dr Paul Willis and our friends at the RiAus, we explore the science behind Hollywood blockbuster Jurassic World and dinosaurs in general on the big screen.

Really the boundary between dinosaurs and birds has become very blurred. Starting in 1996, we’ve now found 40-odd species of feathered dinosaurs. Some fossils reveal feathers very much like birds’ feathers – and some of these animals begin to look more and more like birds themselves, and were even capable of flight in some form.

Learn more in this 15-minute mini documentary.

John Pickrell is the author of Flying Dinosaurs: How fearsome reptiles became birds, published by NewSouth Books in June 2014. Follow him on Twitter @john_pickrell.