Josette Allester tends
    sheep on Tomboy, one of the last remaining properties to have continuously grown
    wool since the mid-1800s.

    Photo Credit: Thomas Wielecki

    These sandstone blocks are all that remains of the wharf at Vincentia, the official end of the Wool Road, where in the 1840s,
    wool was shipped to Sydney and beyond.

    Photo Credit: Thomas Wielecki

    Truffe-finding canine
    extraordinaire Barry
    prepares to go hunting
    with a group of tourists at
    L’Air Du Wombat truffle
    farm along the historic
    Wool Road in NSW.

    Photo Credit: Thomas Wielecki

    The most intact section of the original Wool Road is near Nerriga.

    Photo Credit: Thomas Wielecki

    The Nerriga Hotel.

    Photo Credit: Thomas Wielecki

    Since buying the Nerriga Hotel six years ago, Sarah and Phil Smith have
    given the old pub new life.

    Photo Credit: Thomas Wielecki
    Photo Credit: Thomas Wielecki
    Photo Credit: Thomas Wielecki
    Photo Credit: Thomas Wielecki

    About five years ago a couple of teddies mysteriously appeared in a small cave on the Wool Road. Numbers have since
    grown and it’s now a popular landmark for travellers.

    Photo Credit: Thomas Wielecki

In pictures: travelling the Old Wool Road

By AG Staff | August 28, 2019

From its beginnings as an Aboriginal songline to its heyday as a busy stock route, the Wool Road offers a fascinating journey between Canberra and the coast with plenty of reasons to tarry along its twists and turns.

Our writer Tim Bull and photographer Thomas Wielecki travelled with Shoalhaven Tourism.

To read more about their road trip, pick up Issue 152 from our online store.