One of the more peculiar sites is the hundreds of magnetic termite mounds, found just beyond the entrance. The 2m-high mounds are aligned on the north-south axis as a way to maintain climate conditions inside the mound.

    Photo Credit: brewbooks/Flickr

    The wet season brings an average of 1500mm of rain to Litchfield, closing some of the 4WD tracks but creating some spectacular waterfalls and creeks.

    Photo Credit: Natsumi Penberthy/Australian Geographic

    Tomer Falls, Litchfield National Park. Litchfield NP is at its best during the dry season (May – October), as The Wet can cause the closure of many attractions – but it’s also when the waterfalls are at their most spectacular. 

    Photo Credit: JERRYE & ROY KLOTZ MD/Wikimedia

    Buley Rockhole, Litchfield National Park, Northern Territory. The chain of waterfalls and rock holes is a popular camping and swimming spot, located just 80m from the car park.

    Photo Credit: Bidgee/Wikimedia

    Northern Australia’s magnetic termites (Amitermes Meridionalis) build mounds to provide the colony with warm stable temperatures. magnetic termites are thought to have an inheritable magnetic compass allowing members of a colony to sense a particular magnetic bearing.

    Photo Credit: Bmdavll/Wikimedia

    The wet season brings an average of 1500mm of rain to Litchfield, closing some of the 4WD tracks but creating some spectacular waterfalls.

    Photo Credit: Hansjoerg Morandell/Wikimedia

    Wangi Falls, one of Litchfield’s most popular attractions is often closed for swimming during the wet season when salt water crocodiles frequent the area. However, the falls remain open for viewing at this time and the noise of the rushing water can be heard a great distance away.

    Photo Credit: Ozjimbob/Wikimedia

    Litchfield National Park, one of 15 National Parks in the Northern Territory, is located an hour-and-a-half drive (114km) south-west from the state capital, Darwin. The 1,500km2 park was established in 1986 and has become a popular tourist destination, attracting more than 250,000 visitors a year.

    Photo Credit: Natsumi Penberthy

    Cathedral Termites (Nasutitermes triodiae) defend their mounds numerous tunnels from predators such as ants by expelling a transparent sticky substance. A mound can live for50-100 years with the queen producing all the eggs for the colony.

    Photo Credit: Natsumi Penberthy/Australian Geographic

    Wangi Falls, from its base. Litchfield National Park.

    Photo Credit: Hansjoerg Morandell/Wikimedia

    Wet season lasts from November to March and is distinguished by increased humidity followed by monsoonal rains and storms. The wet season brings an average of 1500mm of rain to Litchfield, closing some of the 4WD tracks but creating some spectacular waterfalls. 

    Photo Credit: Natsumi Penberthy

    Buley Rockhole, a chain of waterfalls and rock-holes is a popular camping and swimming spot in Litchfield National Park. It remains open during the wet season as well as the dry and is accessible by 2WD.

    Photo Credit: David Bristow/Australian Geographic

    Cathedral termites can build their complex mounds up to 6m high.

    Photo Credit: Natsumi Penberthy

    A ranger sprays herbicide as part of a management program implemented by the Department of Land Resource Management to tackle the invasive species gamba grass (Andropogon gayanus). The department supplies land owners with free herbicide and spray equipment to help them meet the Weed Management Plan for the area.

    Photo Credit: Natsumi Penberthy/Australian Geographic

    Pandanus are a genus of palm-like trees that thrive in the warm tropical regions of Australia and can be found all over Litchfield National Park. Pandanus trees are dioecious, meaning they have either male or female reproductive flowers. 

    Photo Credit: Natsumi Penberthy/Australian Geographic

Gallery: Litchfield National Park

By AG STAFF | February 23, 2015

Litchfield National Park is known for its waterfalls and termite mounds