There’s no better introduction to the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area than the Overland Track, the world-famous 80 km walk from Cradle Valley to Cynthia Bay on Lake St Clair.

    Photo Credit: Andy Townsend

    Extensive maintenance and track hardening has transformed the Overland in recent years. Many muddy sections remain, but the track is well-formed and easy to follow with long sections of boardwalk. You’re still in the middle of nowhere though, so don’t worry about it detracting from the wilderness nature of the experience.

    Photo Credit: John Pickrell/Australian Geographic

    Unless you’re stuck with constantly overcast weather, spectacular views over jagged, glacier-carved mountains and alpine lakes will greet you from day one on the Overland Track, Australia’s most popular multi-day bushwalk.

    Photo Credit: Grant Hunt

    Snow-capped 1559 m Barn Bluff rises out of the endless moorlands of buttongrass.

    Photo Credit: Grant Hunt

    The track turns east and descends steeply through rainforest towards the Mersey River at the D’Alton and Fergusson Falls – well worth the 1-2 hour side trip.

    Photo Credit: Grant Hunt

    Deep snowfall over the highest section of the track at Cradle Mountain is an exhilarating experience for our group. Another benefit of going off-season in early October is that you run into very few other walkers along the track.

    Photo Credit: John Pickrell/Australian Geographic

    Thick fog shrouds gum trees a short walk from Cradle Cirque.

    Photo Credit: John Pickrell/Australian Geographic

    Frequent signposts and orange way-markers mean it’s difficult to stray very far from the track, even in difficult weather conditions.

    Photo Credit: John Pickrell/Australian Geographic

    Lichen- and moss-smothered boulders provide unlikely splashes of colour in the green expanses of buttongrass moorlands

    Photo Credit: John Pickrell/Australian Geographic

    Honeymooners from Sydney, Glenn Price and Kirstene Shrubsole, walk through one of the endless alpine buttongrass meadows.

    Photo Credit: John Pickrell/Australian Geographic

    Topped with a puff of cloud, 1559 m Barn Bluff rises out of the endless moorlands of buttongrass.

    Photo Credit: John Pickrell/Australian Geographic

    A classic scene on the Overland Track.

    Photo Credit: John Pickrell/Australian Geographic

    Overland walkers – (from left to right) Anna Reddington, Patrick Horan, Kirstene Shrubsole, Glenn Price, Sue Cory and Joann Williams – take a well-earned rest after a brief but taxing climb to a saddle near the peak of 1340 m Mt Doris.

    Photo Credit: John Pickrell/Australian Geographic

    Battered-looking wooden pathways – and knee-deep stretches of mud – are part of the rustic charm of walking the Overland Track.

    Photo Credit: John Pickrell/Australian Geographic

    Imposing cliffs on the Overland Track, Tasmania.

    Photo Credit: Grant Hunt

    A Bennets wallaby on the Overland Track, Tasmania.

    Photo Credit: Don Fuchs/Australian Geographic

Gallery: Overland Track Tasmania

By AG STAFF | August 20, 2014

Tasmania’s iconic bushwalk winds through 80 km of mountain peaks, alpine meadows, fairytale forests and thundering waterfalls