Eyre Peninsula abounds in startling contrasts. The two huge hammerhead peninsulas, forming Lincoln and Coffin Bay national parks, jut to the east and west respectively. These geological wonders give the region an uncanny symmetry.

    Photo Credit: Andrew Gregory

    West Point Memory Cove wilderness area, Lincoln National Park.

    Photo Credit: Andrew Gregory

    Sunrise at Sensation Beach, Coffin Bay National Park.

    Photo Credit: Andrew Gregory

    An osprey at Coffin Bay.

    Photo Credit:

    A kangaroo leaps into sight at the Memory Cove Wilderness Protection Area, Lincoln National Park.

    Photo Credit: Andrew Gregory

    Eyre Peninsula, South Australia

    Photo Credit: Andrew Gregory

    Pacific gulls (Larus pacificus), Seven Mile Beach, Coffin Bay National Park.

    Photo Credit: Andrew Gregory

    The rocky headland at Almonta Beach, near Point Avoid, Coffin Bay National Park.

    Photo Credit: Andrew Gregory

    School of Dolphins surf a wave off Almonta Beach, Coffin Bay National Park.

    Photo Credit: Andrew Gregory

    Cape Catastrophe, Lincoln National Park.

    Photo Credit: Andrew Gregory

    Sea birds at Wreck Beach, Eyre Peninsula.

    Photo Credit: Andrew Gregory

    Headland near the entrance to Memory Cove, Lincoln National Park.

    Photo Credit: Andrew Gregory

    Gunyah Beach sand dunes, Coffin Bay National Park.

    Photo Credit: Andrew Gregory

    Sensation Beach, Coffin Bay National Park.

    Photo Credit: Andrew Gregory

    Coffin Bay NP is a great four-wheel-drive area.

    Photo Credit: Andrew Gregory

    Headland at Almonta Beach, near Point Avoid, Coffin Bay National Park.

    Photo Credit: Andrew Gregory

    The driver for this multi-barbed coastline is a geological double act. Eyre Peninsula is part of the Gawler Craton, one of the most stable hunks of our continental crust. It

    Photo Credit: Andrew Gregory

    An emu at Coffin Bay National Park.

    Photo Credit: Andrew Gregory

    Scalloped cliffs of pale, biscuit-coloured stone are the Eyre Peninsula’s gritty signature.

    Photo Credit: Andrew Gregory

    Along the foot of the coast, these crystalline-tough basement granites hold fast as robust headlands and broad, wave-cut terraces. This sturdy frontline takes the brunt of the ocean’s heaviest blows, and protects the much younger layers of limestone above.

    Photo Credit: Andrew Gregory

    Eyre Peninsula is home to some of Australia’s oldest rocks, dating back as far as 2.44 billion years – about 1.4 billion of which has seen barely a ripple of tectonic activity.

    Photo Credit: Andrew Gregory

    Eyre Peninsular sports harbours and discreet hideaway bays. But each turns to the open ocean with wildly exposed cliffs and beaches – plus a slew of menacing reefs, islands and unyielding capes, not to mention freakish currents and waves.

    Photo Credit: Andrew Gregory

    In 1802 Matthew Flinders named many locations on the Eyre Peninsula, from his home county in England: Boston Bay, Sleaford Mere, Port Lincoln, Cape Donington.

    Photo Credit: Andrew Gregory

    Jetty at Port Lincoln, South Australia

    Photo Credit: Andrew Gregory

Gallery: Eyre Peninsula, South Australia

By AG STAFF | November 28, 2013

The coastline of Eyre Peninsula, SA, has offered up both tragedy and wealth for more than two centuries.