VORTEX OCEAN

    Swimming in the crystal-clear water of the Kirra beach shore breaks can yield incredible displays of breaking waves. To capture them, you need to place yourself in very shallow, clear water and have the right wave break in front of you, without letting its force push the camera back into your face.

    Kirra Beach, Queensland

    Canon 1DX, 14mm 2.8L, 1/800, f/6.3, ISO 1000, Aquatech water housing, handheld

    Photo Credit: Sean Scott, Queensland

    LIGHT DAPPLED BILLABONG

    This deep, billabong-like section of the river is able to sustain a large population of turtles. I loved the light filtering through the trees so I dived to the bottom and held my breath in wait for one of the many turtles to swim overhead – finally capturing this image.

    Upper Orara River, Upper Orara, New South Wales

    Canon 5D Mk III, Canon 8–15mm fi sheye, 1/160, f/16, ISO 400, two Ikelite 160 substrobes, Aquatica housing, handheld while freediving

    Photo Credit: Richard Wylie, Queensland

    TREE FERNS

    SOFT TREE FERN, DICKSONIA ANTARCTICA

    Despite Canberra’s dry climate, its botanic gardens host an impressive Tasmanian rainforest where a bridge crosses a gully filled with soft tree ferns. I jammed my little point-and-shoot camera against the railing and took a photo of surprising clarity. A conversion to monochrome highlighted the fractal magic of these plants.

    Australian National Botanic Gardens, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory

    Canon SX 540, 24–1400mm (full frame equivalent) at 24mm, 1/40, f/8, ISO 400

    Photo Credit: Raoul Slater, Queensland

    BEETLE’S BIG DINNER

    UNIDENTIFIED SPECIES

    This beetle needs to store enough energy to live through the winter. The grass tree leaves may be one of its favourite foods and it is now eating a big dinner ready for overwintering.

    Australian National Botanic Gardens, Canberra, Australian Capitral Territory

    Nikon D90, Nikon 105mm f/2.8, 1/125, f/5.6, ISO 200, handheld

    Photo Credit: Yicai Chang, China

    BREATHE

    DUSKY DOLPHIN, LAGENORHYNCHUS OBSCURUS

    Dusky dolphins frequent the waters around Kaikoura and the deep, nutrient-rich waters provide a food source for the many cetaceans that frequent the area. Fast moving and curious, these dolphins are interactive creatures that engage with each other in large social communities.

    Kaikoura, New Zealand

    Canon 1DX Mk II, 100–400mm, 1/1000, f/5.6, ISO 500

    Photo Credit: Scott Portelli, New South Wales

    RISE ABOVE

    CURRAWONG, STREPERA SP.

    Currawongs will frequent tourist camps like this one to scavenge for holiday scraps. After a heavy snowfall blanketed the ground, I staked out the area and the birds quickly gathered. A piece of old bread tossed high into the air enticed the more confident birds to spring up in chase.

    Kosciuszko National Park, New South Wales

    Nikon D810, Sigma 24 f/1.4, 1/1250, f/8, ISO 640, handheld

    Photo Credit: Charles Davis, New South Wales

    AWAITING THE BREEZE

    DANDELION, TARAXACUM SP.

    These silky dandelion seed heads give the impression of waiting in a queue for the next breath of air or a gentle breeze to help fl oat them away to a new destination.

    Adelaide, South Australia

    Canon 5D Mk II, Canon MP–E 65mm macro, 1/200, f/2.8, ISO 100, handheld

    Photo Credit: Dianne Galbraith, South Australia

    A CURIOUS ENCOUNTER

    HUMPBACK WHALE, MEGAPTERA NOVAEANGLIAE

    A humpback whale mother and neonate calf appear intrigued by this alien mammal with a camera. I like the curves and elegance of their extended pectoral fi ns – the ‘great wing’ recognised in their genus name, Megaptera. Eye contact with such charismatic megafauna is always beguiling.

    Vava’u, Kingdom of Tonga

    Canon EOS 5DsR, Canon EF 8–15mm f/24L fisheye USM + 1.4 teleconverter (21mm), 1/180, f/8, ISO 400, Nauticam underwater housing, Zen 100mm mini-dome

    Photo Credit: Wayne Osborn, Western Australia

    JUNCTION FALLS – AFTER

    In a matter of seconds, Junction Falls went from a trickle to a roaring wall of thundering stormwater on a wet afternoon. I was fortunate to be there to capture the amazing transformation. Shortly after this shot, the embedded log completely disappeared from view.

    Junction Falls, Blue Mountains, New South Wales

    Canon EOS 1DS Mk III, Canon TS-E 45mm f/2.8, 0.6, f/8, ISO 100, tripod

    Photo Credit: Peter Hill, New South Wales

    The AG Nature Photographer of the Year Awards are sponsored by Coral Expeditions.

    Photo Credit: Coral Expeditions

AG Nature Photographer of the Year 2018: Monochrome shortlist

By AG STAFF | June 18, 2018

Stunning photos of landscapes and animals sit side by side in a gallery that may be without colour, but certainly isn’t without interest. Photographs could be sepia-toned or infrared. These photos will be exhibited at the South Australian Museum in Adelaide (24 August – 11 November 2018 ) and the Australian Museum in Sydney (24 August to 27 January)