The arid nature of the Pullen Pullen landscape has prevented large bushfires sweeping through and frequently burning the spinifex. This is thought to have helped the night parrot survive.

    Photo Credit: Dean Saffron

    Bush Heritage’s Rob Murphy is but a speck in this aerial shot of a crumbling escarpment.

    Photo Credit: Dean Saffron

    Rocky outcrops punctuate the arid plains and catch the late afternoon Sun to spectacular effect.

    Photo Credit: Dean Saffron

    Pullen Pullen Reserve.

    Photo Credit: Dean Saffron

    Mostly very arid, Pullen Pullen reserve is subject to periodic flooding deluges that create sitting floodplains.

    Photo Credit: Dean Saffron

    Spinifex, the favoured nesting place and bolt hole of the night parrot, is abundant at Pullen Pullen.

    Photo Credit: Dean Saffron

    Kangaroos take flight across the arid plains at Pullen Pullen Reserve.

    Photo Credit: Dean Saffron

    Shadows form an abstract pattern in the ubiquitous red dirt of western Queensland’s Pullen Pullen Reserve.

    Photo Credit: Dean Saffron

    Aside from the odd road train, traffic is sparse through the wider region around the reserve.

    Photo Credit: Dean Saffron

    A night parrot as photographed at Pullen Pullen Reserve by Steve Murphy in 2016; even he has only seen the bird on a handful of occasions, more often using its call to track the behaviour of the species. Only three people currently living have verified they’ve seen them live.

    Photo Credit: Steve Murphy

    Biologists Steve Murphy and Rachel Barr look over camera trap images for signs of night parrots.

    Photo Credit: Dean Saffron

    High tech ‘grooming’ traps detect feral cats with infrared and spray them with poison gel.

    Photo Credit: Dean Saffron

    John Read (centre) has developed advanced new feral cat traps which could save the night parrot from extinction.

    Photo Credit: Dean Saffron

    Maiawali traditional owner Judith Harrison.

    Photo Credit: Dean Saffron

    Maiawali traditional owner Judith Harrison and her daughter Tammy Meers.

    Photo Credit: Dean Saffron

    Steve and Rachel prepare equipment that will help track the behaviour of critically endangered night parrots.

    Photo Credit: Dean Saffron

    The yellow spotted monitor is one of a variety of reptiles found in this arid part of western Queensland.

    Photo Credit: Dean Saffron

GALLERY: Pullen Pullen Reserve, QLD

By AG STAFF | September 1, 2016

The 56,000 hectare Pullen Pullen reserve in western Queensland was established as a sanctuary in 2016. Containing the only known population of the endangered night parrots in the world, the reserves exact location remains unknown to the public as a precautionary measure. Read more about how the Pullen Pullen reserve in AG editor John Pickrell’s feature from AG#134, out now.