BOUND TO THE WIRE

    LITTLE RED FLYING-FOX
    Pteropus scapulatus

    A little red flying-fox (Pteropus scapulatus) hangs, perished from entanglement on barbed wire that surrounds an electricity station. Unfortunately, barbed-wire fencing kills many Australian native animals, including bats, birds and macropods.

    Timber Creek, Northern Territory

    Canon EOS 5D Mk III, Canon EF16–35mm f2.8 II USM, 13, f/7.1, ISO 640, tripod, two off-camera Canon 580EX II speedlites, handheld, backlit by moonlight

    Photo Credit: Brad Leue, South Australia

    END OF THE LINE

    EASTERN QUOLL
    Dasyurus viverrinus

    Country roads + speed × darkness = the end of the line. And not only for this poor eastern quoll, but for so many other native mammals across our country. In places like Bruny Island, more needs to be done to limit drivers’ speed at night. Too many
    animals lose their lives every night, not only to speed, but carelessness,
    and, even more sadly, wanton cruelty.

    Bruny Island, Tasmania

    Canon 5D Mk IV, EF 16–35mm f4 L IS, 1/100, f/8, ISO 640, Canon 600RT-EX flash (off camera), handheld, additional fill light with Wolf Eyes torch

    Photo Credit: David Stowe, New South Wales

    THE RESOURCEFUL FINCH

    AUSTRALIAN ZEBRA FINCH
    Taeniopygia castanotis

    Zebra finches are very industrious when it comes to building nests. These
    finches will choose any location they believe will provide the best protection for their nest. In this instance, they have chosen a water bore control panel at a remote  goldmine in the Great Sandy Desert in Western Australia.

    Telfer, Western Australia

    Nikon D7200, Nikkor 80–400 f4.5–5.6 G, 1/1600, f/9, ISO 640, Hoya circular polarising filter, handheld

    Photo Credit: Gary Meredith, Western Australia

    A POSSUM’S LOOKOUT

    COMMON BRUSHTAIL POSSUM
    Trichosurus vulpecula

    A common brushtail possum mother and one of her young peek out of
    a roof space. These possums were waiting for the sun to go down before
    heading out into the night to forage for food. Across Australia, these possums often prefer to live in the roofs of houses rather than in the trees.

    Yallingup, Western Australia

    Nikon D850, Nikkor 24–70 f2.8, 1/250, f/16, ISO 640, Nikon
    SB-700 flash with godox TTL wireless flash trigger, handheld

    Photo Credit: Gary Meredith, Western Australia

    GASPING FOR AIR

    EUROPEAN CARP
    Cyprinus carpio

    In a drought likely contributed to by human-induced climate change and widespread over-clearing, thousands of carp struggle to take a breath in the last pools of water. Ironically, carp are an introduced species that have wrought havoc on our waterways, killing off native species. In the end, they too will die.

    Lachlan River, near Lake Cargelligo, New South Wales

    Canon EOS-1D X Mk II, Canon EF 100mm f2.8 L macro IS USM, 1/640, f/6.3, ISO 800, handheld

    Photo Credit: Georgina Steytler, Western Australia

    THE HAND OF MAN

    LITTLE PENGUIN
    Eudyptula minor

    During Victoria’s duck-shooting season rescuers found spent cartridges, dog prints and freshly shot protected species, along with this little penguin, which the zoo vet said had injuries consistent with dog attack. Instead of a catchlight in the penguin’s eye it is captured in the droplet of blood.

    Point Wilson, Victoria

    Canon EOS 5D Mk III, Canon EF 100–400mm f4.5–5.6 L IS II USM, 1/1600, f/8, ISO 400, handheld

    Photo Credit: Kim Wormald, Victoria

    TRASH OR TREASURE

    SATIN BOWERBIRD
    Ptilonorhynchus violaceus

    Satin bowerbirds have taken advantage of human presence by decorating their bower with bright blue objects. They meticulously place each piece of rubbish around their courtship arena and even parade around with objects in their bill to impress females. In this instance, one person’s trash is another bird’s treasure.

    Gold Coast, Queensland

    Canon 5D Mk IV, Canon 16–35mm f4 IS, 1/30, f/5.6, ISO 4000, tripod

    Photo Credit: Matt Wright, Queensland

    THE WATERING HOLE

    The Menindee Lakes were deliberately drained in 2016–17 and New South Wales has experienced a lengthy drought. Animals and birds desperately seek food and water and there is very little left due to these human-made and natural events. Lake Cawndilla is now just a drying lakebed scattered with the remains of our native animals.

    Cawndilla Creek, Menindee, New South Wales

    DJI Phantom 3 Advanced, 20mm, 1/640, f/2.8, ISO 200, ND4 filter

    Photo Credit: Melissa Williams-Brown, South Australia

    IN THE CAN

    GOLDEN PYGMY GOBY
    Lubricogobius exiguus

    Golden pygmy gobies require a hard surface on which to lay their eggs. In the sandy areas they inhabit, this would ordinarily be a rock, disused shell or even a leaf. Sadly, trawling of these habitats leads to a barren, featureless landscape resulting in no other option than to live among the trash of nearby human habitation.

    Lembeh Strait, Sulawesi, Indonesia

    Nikon D800, Nikkor 105mm macro,
    1/125, f/11, ISO 100, twin INON Z240
    strobes, handheld, Subal underwater housing

    Photo Credit: Richard Smith, United Kingdom

    INVASIVE SPECIES

    GENTOO PENGUIN
    Pygoscelis papua

    Hikers from an expedition ship head uphill to explore a wildlife landing site in the Antarctic region. Visitor site numbers and guide-to-guest ratios are set by the International Association of Antarctic Tour Operators and a balance is struck between environmental protection and an opportunity to experience the continent firsthand.

    Robert Point, Roberts Island, South Shetland Islands

    Canon EOS 5D Mk IV, EF 100–400mm f4.5–5.6 L IS II USM, 1/400, f/22, ISO 400, handheld

    Photo Credit: Andrew Peacock, Queensland

    The AG Nature Photographer of the Year Awards are sponsored by Coral Expeditions.

    Photo Credit:

AG Nature Photographer of the Year 2019: Our impact shortlist

By AG STAFF | June 27, 2019

These photographs reveal the human impact on nature – be it terrestrial, marine or atmospheric. The impact could be either positive or negative. These photos will be exhibited at the South Australian Museum in Adelaide from Friday 16 August until Sunday 10 November 2019 and the Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences in Sydney from Friday 16 August until Sunday October 20