LONE GUM

    Exploring the rugged beauty of Ormiston Gorge in the Northern Territory reveals the struggle that native plants experience daily to survive in such harsh conditions. This lonesome young gum tree on the side of a cliff is determined to grow and shine.

    Ormiston Gorge, Northern Territory

    Nikon D810, 70–300mm at 300mm, 1/320, f/8, ISO 400, handheld

    Photo Credit: Andrew Dickman, South Australia

    TRUNCATED

    BLUE MOUNTAINS ASH, EUCALYPTUS OREADES

    This image is from one of my favourite places, in conditions I love, just a short walk from my home. I tried to capture the grace and independence of this Blue Mountains ash (Eucalyptus oreades) growing on an exposed cliff -top – which this species seems to like.

    Blue Mountains, New South Wales

    Canon EOS 5D Mk IV, Canon 40mm, 1/10, f/16, ISO 100, tripod

    Photo Credit: Ian Brown, New South Wales

    REFLECTED VEGETATION

    The spring-fed limestone ponds of the Ewens Ponds Conservation Park are a sight to behold. These crystal-clear waters enable unusual plant species to grow under water to a depth of about 6m. Some species are not found growing fully submerged anywhere else in the world.

    Ewens Ponds Conservation Park, South Australia

    Nikon D800, Nikon 10.5mm, 1/160, f/9, ISO 200, Ikelite underwater housing and two Ikelite DS161 strobes

    Photo Credit: Justin Gilligan, New South Wales

    SAND BOTTLEBRUSH

    SAND BOTTLEBRUSH, BEAUFORTIA SQUARROSA

    I found myself in a photographic rut, where I believed that to take good botanical images I needed a large amount of equipment and perfect conditions. However, I found a new freedom in using a handheld, fast 50mm lens and a set of extension tubes.

    Kings Park Botanic Gardens, Western Australia

    Nikon D810, Nikon 50mm f/1.4 plus 36mm Kenko extension tube, 1/250, f/2.2, ISO 800, handheld

    Photo Credit: Andrew Davoll, Western Australia

    PANDANI IN THE MIST

    PANDANI, RICHEA PANDANIFOLIA

    The almost tropical-like Richea pandanifolia dominates this ancient subalpine landscape deep in the heart of Tasmania’s South-West National Park wilderness.

    South-West National Park, Tasmania

    Nikon D800, Nikon 16–35 f/4 at 22mm, 0.5, f/16, ISO 100

    Photo Credit: Nick Monk, Tasmania

    PANDANI IN BLIZZARD

    PANDANI, RICHEA PANDANIFOLIA

    At the age of 51, I lost my falling snow virginity at Waldheim. I was so overwhelmed by frozen feet, crusted spectacles and the unbearable beauty that I could not take a coherent photo. I returned the next day prepared: car heater cranking and camera pointed at a sublime composition. Just add blizzard.

    Waldheim, Cradle Valley, Tasmania

    Canon 5DII, 100mm macro f/2.8, 1/15, f/14, ISO 400, beanbag on car window frame

    Photo Credit: Raoul Slater, Queensland

    INTERTIDAL WATERCOLOUR

    The rugged limestone coastline of South Australia’s south-east supports a widely diverse biosphere, with an estimated 100 types of seaweed found around the coastal town of Beachport alone. At low tide, large intertidal rock platforms are exposed, displaying the full technicolour gamut of this diversity.

    Beachport, South Australia

    Nikon D800, Sigma 35mm f/1.4 art series, 30, f/4, ISO 800, Lee Big Stopper fi lter, Manfrotto tripod

    Photo Credit: David Rubinich, South Australia

    TANGLEFOOT

    FAGUS, NOTHOFAGUS GUNNII

    Australia’s only native winter-deciduous tree, Nothofagus gunnii, commonly known simply as fagus, crawls across the quartzite rocks and demonstrates the origin of its earlier known nickname of tanglefoot.

    Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park, Tasmania

    Nikon D800, Nikon 16–35 f/4 at 16mm, 2.5, f/13, ISO 100

    Photo Credit: Nick Monk, Tasmania

    SUNDEW

    SUNDEW, DROSERA SP.

    The beauty of this plant belies its carnivorous nature. I wanted to make the delicate droplets stand out so I chose a sunlit plant with a background in the shadow. I then deliberately underexposed the image to complete the eff ect.

    Albany, Western Australia

    Canon EOS-1D X Mk II, Canon EF 600mm f/4L IS USM, 1/640, f/11, ISO 1600, handheld

    Photo Credit: Georgina Steytler, Western Australia

    THE REFUGE

    RED MANGROVES, RHIZOPHORA STYLOSA

    Red mangroves (Rhizophora stylosa) grow in a sheltered corner of Lizard Island Lagoon. Their tangled roots provide shelter to many species of fi sh from the nearby coral reefs, including this school of tropical anchovies that streamed past my camera.

    Mangrove Bay, Lizard Island

    Canon Powershot G10, 28–140mm f/2.8–4.5, 1/20, f/4, ISO 80

    Photo Credit: Andy Lewis, Queensland

    The AG Nature Photographer of the Year Awards are sponsored by Coral Expeditions.

    Photo Credit: Coral Expeditions

AG Nature Photographer of the Year 2018: Botanical shortlist

By AG STAFF | June 14, 2018

Photos entered in the Botanical category could be habitat or portrait shots. This shortlist is testament to the gorgeous array of landscapes and plant life that surrounds us. These photos will be exhibited at the South Australian Museum in Adelaide (24 August – 11 November 2018 ) and the Australian Museum in Sydney (24 August to 27 January)