Exterior of the Garden Palace, Sydney, c1879. Architect James Barnett modelled the cathedral-like building on London’s Crystal Palace. It was built in just eight months, opening in September 1879 for the Sydney International Exhibition.
    Photo Credit: Courtesy Kaldor Public Art Projects/Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences, Sydney

    Exterior of the Garden Palace, Sydney, c1879. With a floor area of 20,000sq.m, the Garden Palace was three times the size of Sydney’s Queen Victoria Building and towered over the city.

    Photo Credit: Courtesy Kaldor Public Art Projects/Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences, Sydney

    Litograph, Burning of the Garden Palace, Sydney, Gibbs Shallard and Company, Sydney, 1882. The mostly-wooden building began to burn in the early hours of Friday 22 September 1882.

     

    Photo Credit: Courtesy of Kaldor Public Art Projects/Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences, Sydney.
    Remains of the Garden Palace after the fire in 1882. In addition to holding New South Wales’ collection of Indigenous artefacts, the building also housed census and government data, mining and technological museums and a commerical space for furniture.
    Photo Credit: Courtesy Kaldor Public Art Projects/Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences, Sydney.

    Jonathan Jones with prototype ceramic shield on site at the Royal Botanic Garden, Sydney. “Barrangal dyara is a response to the immense loss felt throughout Australia due to the destruction of countless culturally significant Aboriginal objects,” he says. “It represents an effort to commence a healing process and a celebration of the survival of the world’s oldest living culture despite this traumatic event.”

    Photo Credit: Emma Pike/Kaldor Public Art Projects

    Aerial shot of barrangal dyara (skin and bones).

    Photo Credit: Emma Pike/Kaldor Public Art Projects

    Jonathan Jones places shields down for barrangal dyara.

    Photo Credit: Emma Pike/Kaldor Public Art Projects

GALLERY: Jonathan Jones’s barrangal dyara

By AG STAFF | September 30, 2016

In 1882, a three-year-old palace at Sydney’s Royal Botanic Garden was destroyed by fire – and with it, thousands of Indigenous artefacts. The new barrangal dyara (skin and bones) installation is a reminder of what was lost. Read more about the Garden Palace fire and Jonathan’s artwork here.