The snowmobile convoy on a valley expedition in Greenland. Dean and Aaron are on two-month expedition to explore and document the landscape and animals and people that call it home.

    Photo Credit: Dean Miller & Aaron Jamieson

    Greenland has received international attention of late, especially in climate science circles, because it is changing rapidly. If you want to fully understand environmental change, you have to see it for yourself – and that’s what Dean Miller and Aaron Jamieson has done.

    Photo Credit: Dean Miller & Aaron Jamieson

    When you’re this far north, in the Arctic circle, you are sure to see aurora borealis – the northern lights.

    Photo Credit: Dean Miller & Aaron Jamieson

    A tent is lit up in the dark night sky, with no other light around. Embarking on an expedition to the Arctic is like heading out to sea; once you leave the safety of home, you are on your own. Greenland – technically part of Denmark – is a vast, frozen landmass. 

    Photo Credit: Dean Miller & Aaron Jamieson

    Travelling by snowmobile is really the only way to get around on the Greenland icecap. In just eight weeks, Dean Miller and Aaron Jamieson travelled by land, sea and air over more than 5000km of terrain.

    Photo Credit: Dean Miller & Aaron Jamieson

    Greenland’s highest peaks, up to 3700m, belong to the Watkins Mountains; the ice sheet here is more than 2.5km deep.

    Photo Credit: Dean Miller & Aaron Jamieson

    Dean flies the AG Society flag, having reached the highest point of the climb in Greenland.

    Photo Credit: Dean Miller & Aaron Jamieson

    Dean Miller and Aaron Jamieson climb up to a high point on the Greenland Ice Sheet, second only in size to Antarctica. 

    Photo Credit: Dean Miller & Aaron Jamieson

    A village boy proudly displays the ­drying furs of animals his father has killed.

    Photo Credit: Dean Miller & Aaron Jamieson

    Greenland – technically part of Denmark – is a vast, frozen landmass. More than 2 million sq.km in area, it is almost as large as WA. Despite its size, only 57,000 people call it home and far fewer live on the east coast than the west. 

    Photo Credit: Dean Miller & Aaron Jamieson

    Polar bear inhabit the ice sheets of the Artic. Their numbers are threatened by the melting ice sped up by climate change.

    Photo Credit: Chrissie Goldrick

    Aaron Jamieson takes some footage in Greenland. Capturing video and images was a challenge, with frigid temperatures to contend with.

    Photo Credit: Dean Miller & Aaron Jamieson

Greenland: Frontier of climate change

By AG STAFF | June 24, 2014

In the name of conservation, a team of Australian explorers captures the transient and beguiling beauty of East Greenland.