Indigenous Australia

Lost images of Australia’s 1965 Freedom Ride

History & Culture

One hundred photos of Australia’s Freedom Ride – the now historic 1965 campaign that protested discrimination against indigenous Australians – have been discovered in the archives of the State Library of NSW. Led by one of the first indigenous students at the University of Sydney, Kumantjayi (Charles) Perkins, the Freedom Ride was a bus tour of western and coastal NSW communities that received intense media coverage at the height of the ’60s indigenous civil rights movement. Put together by Sydney University’s Student Action for Aborigines (SAFA), the ride protested continued differences in indigenous and non-indigenous rights in Australia – particularly exclusion of indigenous people from using public places like the Bowraville Picture Theatre, the Walgett RSL and the Moree Baths. The historic photos were captured by photographer and journalist Noel Hazzard from The Tribune – a newspaper run by Communist Party of Australia – who spent one week in Moree and in nearby Walgett on the Freedom Ride. The images are now showing for the first time in an exhibition at the State Library of New South Wales called: Freedom Ride ’65: Unpublished photos from The Tribune Archive.

Gallery: Alice Springs places and faces

Destinations

Straddling the ephemeral Todd River, Alice Springs is the second largest town in the Northern Territory and the geographical heart of Australia, or as locals are given to saying, “the town closest to every beach in Oz”. In reality, it’s 1200km as the crow flies to the nearest ocean and about 1500km to the closest major cities, Adelaide and Darwin. It has a population of approximately 28,000, 12 per cent of the NT’s population.