Tag: deep sea

The Neil Armstrong of ocean exploration: Victor Vescovo (Rebroadcast)

While 12 people have walked on the moon only three have ever been to the bottom of the ocean. That’s the scale of the life-changing challenge that undersea explorer Victor Vescovo had taken on: Successfully diving the five deeps of the world. After the private equity investor and retired naval officer decided to fund this ground breaking project all by himself, Victor and his team had to overcome many technical challenges by trying to achieve something that has never been done before. The result was a brand new form of submarine that can go to the greatest depths and come back in one piece and do it all over again. On this episode Victor talks about the challenges that led up to his mission and the findings after being down deep like new species that has never been discovered before and new accurate maps of the ocean floors. Here you can find out more about Victors endeavours: https://www.australiangeographic.com.au/australian-geographic-adventure/adventure/2019/09/deeper-than-mt-everest-is-high-diving-the-mariana-trench/ This Episode of Talking Australia is hosted by Chrissie Goldrick (Editor-in-chief at Australian Geographic) and produced by Ben Kanthak (www.beachshackpodcasts.com). You can also follow us on Instagram @australiangeographic

How to handle fear and BASE jump off a cliff: Glenn Singleman Pt. 1 (Rebroadcast)

Dr. Glenn Singleman has achieved so many things in his life that one might ask whether his day has more than 24 hours. He is an emergency doctor, a mountaineer, a skydiver, a record-breaking high-altitude BASE jumper and wingsuit pilot, a motivational speaker, a husband, a father and submarine medical doctor who joined both world-famous director James Cameron and businessman and explorer Victor Vescovo on their journeys to the bottom of the ocean. He also goes trail running every morning, is a passionate vegan and has obtained several university degrees covering everything from medicine to film making. But it all started with Glenn overcoming his fears. And he says that everyone can do the same, treating fear as a good friend rather than letting it take over and stop us from doing things we think are otherwise impossible. Here you can find out more about Glenn: https://www.baseclimb.com This Episode of Talking Australia is hosted by Liz Ginis (Managing Editor Digital at Australian Geographic) and produced by Ben Kanthak (www.beachshackpodcasts.com). You can also follow us on Instagram @australiangeographic

How to handle fear and BASE jump off a cliff: Glenn Singleman Pt. 2 (Rebroadcast)

Dr. Glenn Singleman has achieved so many things in his life that one might ask whether his day has more than 24 hours. He is an emergency doctor, a mountaineer, a skydiver, a record-breaking high-altitude BASE jumper and wingsuit pilot, a motivational speaker, a husband, a father and submarine medical doctor who joined both world-famous director James Cameron and businessman and explorer Victor Vescovo on their journeys to the bottom of the ocean. He also goes trail running every morning, is a passionate vegan and has obtained several university degrees covering everything from medicine to film making. But it all started with Glenn overcoming his fears. And he says that everyone can do the same, treating fear as a good friend rather than letting it take over and stop us from doing things we think are otherwise impossible. Here you can find out more about Glenn: https://www.baseclimb.com This Episode of Talking Australia is hosted by Liz Ginis (Managing Editor Digital at Australian Geographic) and produced by Ben Kanthak (www.beachshackpodcasts.com). You can also follow us on Instagram @australiangeographic

The Neil Armstrong of ocean exploration: Victor Vescovo

While 12 people have walked on the moon only three have ever been to the bottom of the ocean. That’s the scale of the life-changing challenge that undersea explorer Victor Vescovo had taken on: Successfully diving the five deeps of the world. After the private equity investor and retired naval officer decided to fund this ground breaking project all by himself, Victor and his team had to overcome many technical challenges by trying to achieve something that has never been done before. The result was a brand new form of submarine that can go to the greatest depths and come back in one piece and do it all over again. On this episode Victor talks about the challenges that led up to his mission and the findings after being down deep like new species that has never been discovered before and new accurate maps of the ocean floors. Here you can find out more about Victors endeavours: https://www.australiangeographic.com.au/australian-geographic-adventure/adventure/2019/09/deeper-than-mt-everest-is-high-diving-the-mariana-trench/ This Episode of Talking Australia is hosted by Chrissie Goldrick (Editor-in-chief at Australian Geographic) and produced by Ben Kanthak (www.beachshackpodcasts.com). You can also follow us on Instagram @australiangeographic

How to handle fear and BASE jump off a cliff: Glenn Singleman (Part 2)

Dr. Glenn Singleman has achieved so many things in his life that one might ask whether his day has more than 24 hours. He is an emergency doctor, a mountaineer, a skydiver, a record-breaking high-altitude BASE jumper and wingsuit pilot, a motivational speaker, a husband, a father and submarine medical doctor who joined both world-famous director James Cameron and businessman and explorer Victor Vescovo on their journeys to the bottom of the ocean. He also goes trail running every morning, is a passionate vegan and has obtained several university degrees covering everything from medicine to film making. But it all started with Glenn overcoming his fears. And he says that everyone can do the same, treating fear as a good friend rather than letting it take over and stop us from doing things we think are otherwise impossible. Here you can find out more about Glenn: https://www.baseclimb.com This Episode of Talking Australia is hosted by Liz Ginis (Managing Editor Digital at Australian Geographic) and produced by Ben Kanthak (www.beachshackpodcasts.com). You can also follow us on Instagram @australiangeographic.

How to handle fear and BASE jump off a cliff: Glenn Singleman (Part 1)

Dr. Glenn Singleman has achieved so many things in his life that one might ask whether his day has more than 24 hours. He is an emergency doctor, a mountaineer, a skydiver, a record-breaking high-altitude BASE jumper and wingsuit pilot, a motivational speaker, a husband, a father and submarine medical doctor who joined both world-famous director James Cameron and businessman and explorer Victor Vescovo on their journeys to the bottom of the ocean. He also goes trail running every morning, is a passionate vegan and has obtained several university degrees covering everything from medicine to film making. But it all started with Glenn overcoming his fears. And he says that everyone can do the same, treating fear as a good friend rather than letting it take over and stop us from doing things we think are otherwise impossible. Here you can find out more about Glenn: https://www.baseclimb.com This Episode of Talking Australia is hosted by Liz Ginis (Managing Editor Digital at Australian Geographic) and produced by Ben Kanthak (www.beachshackpodcasts.com). You can also follow us on Instagram @australiangeographic.

Wildlife

Prehistoric marine creatures: monsters of the deep

Australia was a wet and wild place in the Cretaceous Period (145-65 million years ago), and not a safe spot for a dip in the sea. It was closer to the South Pole, but a warmer world meant temperate regions stretched further south than today. The Eromanga Sea covered much of Queensland; this body of water was so vast at one point that it extended into South Australia, splitting the continent. While dinosaurs held sway on the land, exotic reptiles flourished in the inland sea. Four major groups dominated. Ichthyosaurs were dolphin-like predators with four flippers and a vertical tail fin. Sea turtles were represented by four known species, one of which was a 4m giant. Plesiosaurs had four flippers, but two different body types: large-headed, small-necked forms (called pliosaurs); and small-headed, long-necked forms. Neck length was taken to extremes in one group, the elasmosaurs. Mosasaurs, which didn’t appear until about the time that ichthyosaurs became extinct and the Eromanga Sea retreated, were long-bodied predators related to snakes and monitor lizards. Of these four diverse and successful groups, only the turtles remain in the oceans. Text by Maria Zammit