Winners of microscopic photography competition announced

By AG Staff Writer | November 3, 2016

The rarely seen, amazing microscopic world is celebrated with these winning images from Nikon’s 2016 Small World Photomicrography Competition.

NIKON HAS ANNOUNCED the winners of its 2016 Small World Photomicrography Competition, a collection of amazing images showcasing the world in microscopic view.

The winning images range from a microscopic zebra fish face to a butterfly proboscis and neurons derived from human cells.

“Whether an image provides a rare glimpse into cutting-edge medical research … or reveals a fun “too-close-for-comfort” look into the eyes of a spider … each evokes a powerful reaction from our judges,” said Eric Flem, Communications Manager at Nikon Instruments.

“Every year we’re looking for that image that makes people lean forward in their seats, sparks their curiosity and leads them to ask new questions,” he said.

nikon small world

1st place: Four-day-old zebrafish embryo, Confocal, 10x Credit: Dr Oscar Ruiz (USA)

Scientists, photographers and hobbyists from 70 countries (including Australia) submitted more than 2000 entries, from which judges selected 20 winners, 14 honourable mentions and 61 images of distinction.

The overall winning photo (above) of a four-day old zebrafish embryo was taken by Oscar Ruiz PhD for his research on facial development and mutation tracking in his lab at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas.

The winning photos were first revealed on the Nikon Instruments Instagram account and can be viewed on www.nikonsmallworld.com.

Here is a selection of some of the best microscopic photos:

nikon small world

2nd place: Polished slab of Teepee Canyon agate, Stereomicroscopy 90x Credit: Douglas L. Moore (USA)

nikon small world

3rd place: Culture of neurons (stained green) derived from human skin cells, and Schwann cells, a second type of brain cell (stained red), Confocal/Immunofluorescence/iPSCs, 20x Credit: Rebecca Nutbrown (University of Oxford, UK)

nikon small world

4th place: Butterfly proboscis, Image Stacking, 6.3x Credit: Jochen Schroeder (Thailand)

nikon small world

5th place: Front foot (tarsus) of a male diving beetle, Confocal, 100x Credit: Dr. Igor Siwanowicz (Howard Hughes Medical Institute, USA)

nikon small world

13th place: Poison fangs of a centipede (Lithobius erythrocephalus), Fiber Optic Illumination/Image Stacking, 16x Credit: Walter Piorkowski (USA)

nikon small world

18th place: Parts of wing-cover (elytron), abdominal segments and hind leg of a broad-shouldered leaf beetle (Oreina cacaliae), Stereomicroscopy, Image Stacking, 40x Credit: Pia Scanlon (Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia, Biosecurity and Regulation – Pest Diagnostics South Perth)

nikon small world

Honorouble mention: Scales of a butterfly wing, Confocal, 10x Credit: Evan Darling (USA)

nikon small world

Image of Distinction: The prolegs of a hairy caterpillar gripping a small branch, Reflected Light, 4x Credit: James Dorey (Australia)