A passing snow shower dapples the sky above Lake Seal, centre, and nearby Platypus Tarn.

    Photo Credit: Ian Connellan and Gail MacCallum

    Ice melt pools around dolerite boulders in Robert Tarn.

    Photo Credit: Ian Connellan and Gail MacCallum

    High life: Mt Mawson volunteer patroller George Mackay gets some air time while waiting for the Rodway tow to open.

    Photo Credit: Ian Connellan and Gail MacCallum

    Inside the ticket office at Mount Mawson skifield, Pam Holdsworth demonstrates using a nutcracker towrope.

    Photo Credit: Ian Connellan and Gail MacCallum

    Eucalyptus regnans with its distinctive peeling bark next to Lady Barron Falls Creek.

    Photo Credit: Ian Connellan and Gail MacCallum

    Lake Dobson’s shores are dotted with pencil pines estimated to be up to 1000 years old.

    Photo Credit: Ian Connellan & Gail MacCallum

    Maree Jones and Melanie Peters welcome a steady stream of visitors to the park information centre on a sunny Sunday.

    Photo Credit: Ian Connellan and Gail MacCallum

    View at dawn looking west towards Mt Field from Karanja.

    Photo Credit: Ian Connellan

    In the Pandani Grove on the shores of Lake Dobson, the trail wends through Pandani – the world’s largest heath, at at least 4m high.

    Photo Credit: Ian Connellan and Gail MacCallum

    Beautiful Russell Falls was the original reason land at Mt Field was first reserved in March 1885.

    Photo Credit: Ian Connellan & Gail MacCallum

    Flowers of the endemic rainforest tree sassafras (Atherosperma moschatum).

    Photo Credit: Ian Connellan & Gail MacCallum

    Spore bearing capsules – sporangia – on one of the myriad forms of moss that clothe trees and man ferns on the Russell Falls Nature Walk.

    Photo Credit: Ian Connellan and Gail MacCallum

    Mt Field’s greatest diversity arguably lies in its moss, lichen and fungi species, such as this Stereum ostrea.

    Photo Credit: Ian Connellan & Gail MacCallum

    The endangered fagus tree (Nothofagus gunnii), more commonly known as Tanglefoot, is Australia’s only cold climate winter-deciduous tree, endemic to Tasmania.

    Photo Credit: Tourism Tasmania & Geoff Murray

    The fagus tree is now mostly found within the Tasmanian World Heritage Area, which includes Mt Field.

     

     

    Photo Credit: Tourism Tasmania & Chris Crerar

    Swamp gum (Eucalyptus regnans) on the Tall Trees Walk in Mt Field National Park.

    Photo Credit: Tourism Tasmania & Geoffrey Lea

    The town of Maydena as seen from west Mt Field.

    Photo Credit: Tourism Tasmania & Richard Bennett

    The fagus tree grows along Mt Field’s Tarn Shelf, a series of small glacial lakes.

     

    Photo Credit: Tourism Tasmania & Symple Creative

    The alpine shelf of Mount Field West.

    Photo Credit: Tourism Tasmania & Dean Logan

    The fagus tree along the Tarn Shelf of Mount Field.

    Photo Credit: Tourism Tasmania & Michael Walters Photography

    Tarns, or mountain pools, litter Mt Field. They are formed when rain or river water fills a hole or cirque once filled by a glacier.

    Photo Credit: Tourism Tasmania & Lynette Graham

    While pademelons (Thylogale billardierii) are extinct on mainland Australia, they can be seen throughout Tasmania, including in Mt Field National Park. 

    Photo Credit: Tourism Tasmania & Massaki Aihara

    A popular tourist destination at the base of Mt Field, Russell Falls attracted 15,000 visitors last year.

    Photo Credit: Tourism Tasmania & Michael Walters Photography

    Beyond Russell Falls are Horseshoe Falls, an equally beautiful but less visited site.

    Photo Credit: Tourism Australia & Graham Freeman

    The Parks and Wildlife Service has regular Tall Tree walks throughout Mount Field.

    Photo Credit: Tourism Tasmania & Michael Walters Photography

    A popular tourist destination at the base of Mount Field, Russell Falls attracted 15,000 visitors last year.

    Photo Credit: Tourism Tasmania & Rob Burnett

    One of the first two national parks declared in Tasmania, alongside Freycinet, Mount Field will celebrate its 100th birthday in August 2016

    Photo Credit: Tourism Tasmania & Rob Burnett

    Several bushwalking paths and tracks exist on Mount Field, including old ‘pack track’ runs from Lake Dobson to Lake Fenton.

    Photo Credit: Tourism Tasmania & James Bowden

GALLERY: Mount Field, Tasmania

By AG STAFF | April 6, 2016

Only an hour north-west of Hobart, Mount Field is an enduring favourite of outdoor enthusiasts, with its wallaby-tracked snow fields, lakes and tarns (lakes formed in remnant glacial cirques). In autumn, the deciduous fagus tree erupts into colour across the mountain. Read about Mount Field’s beautiful peaks and the conservation efforts to protect the 100-year-old national park in AG#132, out now.