Image: Getty images

Big help for a little penguin

  • BY Rebecca Baker |
  • November 05, 2012

Help scientists research into Australia's only penguin!

DONATE NOW

Due to the ongoing threat of climate change, human disturbance and feral animals, one of the smallest penguins in the world, our little penguin, needs help.

One colony in Manly, NSW, is already listed as endangered. Populations on Penguin Island in Western Australia also need our attention, with this special population being genetically distinct from other colonies around Australia. 
   
Your donations will assist scientists in understanding how these threats are impacting different little penguin populations. Scientists also hope to contribute to overarching conservation strategies for little penguins, to safeguard them for future generations.

Protecting penguins
The species once occupied a large range along Australia's mainland coast and nearby islands, but a number of threats - including habitat destruction, feral-animal attacks, pollution and a deteriorating food supply - have led to a dramatic decline in its numbers.

The little penguin now has a patchy distribution along mainland temperate-zone coasts; populations are largely restricted to Australia's small offshore islands, like Penguin Island in WA. The species is protected and one colony near Manly, in Sydney Harbour, is listed as endangered.

There's little doubt these animals require attention, care and study. Show your support this Christmas by making a donation in Australian Geographic Stores, online or directly via cheque. Your contribution will assist scientists checking the health of little penguin populations and investigating the major causes of their decline. 

Did you know?

  • The little penguin is the only penguin species that breeds on the Australian mainland.
  • The little penguin stands about 35cm high and weighs about 1kg when fully grown.
  • Little penguins can swim 8km/h and dive as deep as 60m!


How can you help? 
DONATE NOW or like us on Facebook to hear about AG Society conservation efforts at: www.facebook.com/AustralianGeographicSociety